Bee – The most important living being on the earth

Why are Honey Bees so important and why should we start working on saving them..?

One out of every three bites of food we eat is a result of pollinators like honey bees, and crops like blueberries and cherries are 90 per cent dependent on pollination. Honey bees are so important that farmers often have bee hives transported and then placed on their farm to provide pollination for their crops.

If you look at the plate of food on your dinner table, bees have played their part either pollinating the many vegetables and fruits we eat directly, or pollinating the food for the animals that we then consume. And that’s not all bees do for us – honey and wax are two other important products that come courtesy of bees.

But honey bees are disappearing globally at an alarming rate due to pesticides, parasites, disease and habitat loss. If these little insects that help provide so much of the food we eat were to vanish, what would we do without them?

Lot of honey bees lose their way at times due to the mobile network towers and other radiation around our residences. The simplest thing you could do is leave a small bowl of water with little sugar diluted in it. If you ever spot a bee looking disoriented just add a few cubes of sugar in a spoon full of water and leave it near the bee. In a matter of few minutes the bee will sip it up and fly back. Try it..!!

Indian peafowl

Indian peafowl
The Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus), also known as the common peafowl, and blue peafowl, is a peafowl species native to the Indian subcontinent. It has been introduced to many other countries

Jungle Babbler

Jungle Babbler
They are gregarious birds that forage in small groups of six to ten birds, a habit that has given them the popular name of “Seven Sisters” in urban Northern India, and seven brothers in Bengali with cognates in other regional languages which also mean “seven brothers”.

Asian Koel

Asian Koel

The Asian koel (Eudynamys scolopaceus) is a member of the cuckoo order of birds, the Cuculiformes. It is found in the Indian Subcontinent, China, and Southeast Asia. It forms a superspecies with the closely related black-billed koels, and Pacific koels which are sometimes treated as subspecies. The Asian koel like many of its related cuckoo kin is a brood parasite that lays its eggs in the nests of crows and other hosts, who raise its young. They are unusual among the cuckoos in being largely frugivorous as adults. The name koel is echoic in origin with several language variants.

From the different perspective